Research: Corporate Social Responsibility For Tea Plantations In India: A Gandhian Perspective

The purpose of the contemplated research is to examine how Gandhian principles can shape the business practices of tea corporations for greater impact on the lives and working conditions of tea plantation workers in India. Gandhian principles allow organizations to develop business processes that are based on mindful consumption, sustainable utilization of natural resources, sustainable livelihoods, and equitable distribution of wealth; thereby, directing business leaders to pursue a corporate social responsibility strategy of not only doing good, but also of being good (Diwan, 1982).

Research: Teentrepreneurship: A New Entrepreneurship Framework For At-Risk Teenagers in South Africa

South African youth are facing an employment crisis. The deficient national education system and lack of skills development are two of the major issues which are contributing to a high youth unemployment rate. The at-risk teenager communities are predominantly living in poverty amidst various other social ills. The positive impact that entrepreneurship may have on communities is significant, hence the suggestion that entrepreneurial intervention at an early age can enhance the socio-economic empowerment of teenagers.

Book: Paths To Nowhere-Africa’s Endless Walk To Economic Freedom

Africa is wealthy beneath the soil. Gold, diamonds, and other precious natural resources have, from ancient times, pulled people from all over the world to Africa, and yet the masses whose feet tread on such riches are being led on unknown paths with virtually nothing to show to the world but poverty. The worsening situation regarding poverty, unemployment, hunger, violence, illiteracy, disease, environmental degradation, etc. pose a security threat not only for the people of Africa but the entire world.

Research: Sustainable Anti-Poverty Strategies In The Context of Family Complexity: An Investigation of Northern Nigeria

Poverty and poverty reduction are prominent topics of discussion at international development meetings. Despite the existence of both private and public initiatives to combat it, over 1 billion people still live in extreme poverty, about half of whom are in sub-Saharan African countries (MDG, 2015). Poverty Global Practice, a poverty policy monitoring and evaluation unit of the World Bank, indicates that, for countries in Africa, poverty continues to rise because anti-poverty policies fail to reduce poverty (PGP, 2016), a view shared by the literature on poverty reduction in Africa (Dagusta, 2007; McCloskey, 2015). It has been suggested that more comprehensive and coordinated methods could help anti-poverty programmes overcome some of the major challenges to alleviating global poverty (Ravallion, 2016). In line with this suggestion, the proposed research examines the potential of sustainable anti-poverty strategies through the triangulation of three research domains: multidimensional poverty, family functioning, and social justice theories. The contemplated research attempts to construct a new conceptual framework that better integrates theory with praxis to explain the impact of poverty and, thus, develop a sustainable model for anti-poverty policies for sub-Saharan African countries with particular focus on the family as complexities of poverty.

Research: The Delivery of Public-Private Partnership Projects: A Study of the Ghanaian Construction Industry

Public private partnerships have been adopted in the Ghanaian economic development agenda as a viable solution to meet the country’s infrastructure needs since 2000. The adoption has become significant in the reality of the shortage of government financial resources coupled with public sector inefficiencies. Following this, Ghana has made several attempts to practically reap the benefit of PPP under its infrastructure development. Unfortunately, there have been reports of massive failures in the PPP initiatives since 2000 by previous governments and reports on several challenges that are perceived to have deterred private investors from responding quickly to this need.

Research: Impact Evaluation Of Economic Aid in Developing Countries: A Case Study Of The Sahel Region Of Africa

Ranked in the bottom 10 countries within the Human Development Index (UNDP, 2015), Sahel countries not only face chronic poverty, but also compounded disasters. After three decades of implementing projects and programs through economic aid, few tangible changes have been achieved. Rarely, some improvements have been observed, but it has been difficult to correlate these changes to any one intervention.